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that lies beneath the entire state of california. this is all the more surprising because before its settlement, low rainfall made most of this region a virtual desert. the coastal plain of southern california, of which orange county is a part, is particularly well suited for, uh, groundwater storage. it has several things going for it. a--it's very deep, some 4,000 feet deep, uh, to, uh... all containing fresh water, of which we only use about the upper 1,500 feet. it has a, uh... surface water supply. it's the only perennial stream in southern california. the--this stream is fed by-- by snow melt in a very large mountain range behind us. again, in a desert area, we have snow that feeds a perennial river system which provides continuous water supply. another factor that helps out a great deal in maintaining the flow of the water down this river is the fact that we have considerable residential and commercial development upstream of us, which, uh, provides us waters of waste-water origin. that means the water has gone through a treatment plant once upstream and has gone through a ser
, in southern california and in many other areas as well, there are seasonal fluctuations in the lake level. typically, lake levels are low in the summer, but whatever season they're low, earth-moving equipment can come in and excavate these sands from the dry foreshore area. the foreshore deltas in these reservoirs contain most of the beach-size sand, and these will be high and dry when lake levels are low. so they can be collected with standard earth-moving equipment and trucked directly to the beach or reintroduced to the stream beds downstream. if there is technology and engineering available for transporting sand around dams, why isn't this being done? one reason may be that many scientists originally rejected the idea that dams actually contribute to erosion. but that is no longer the case. the problem currently seems to be that the value of sand as a coastal resource may still not be fully recognized. a lot of this sand is already excavated by sand and gravel companies for construction material. it should be treated as a public resource and a fair market value paid for it. for instan
Search Results 0 to 1 of about 2